Posted On: Monday, Jun 26, 2017 - 5:03 pm

Do energy efficiency “audits” really benefit companies over time? An interdisciplinary team of Duke researchers (economist Gale Boyd, statistician Jerry Reiter, and doctoral student Nicole Dalzell) have been tackling this question as it applies to a long-running Department of Energy (DOE) effort that is slated for elimination under President Trump’s proposed budget.

Since 1976, the DOE’s Industrial Assessments Centers (IAC) program has aimed to help small- and medium-sized manufacturers to become more energy-efficient by providing free energy “audits” from universities across the country. (Currently, 28 universities take part, including North Carolina State University.)

The Duke researchers’ project, supported by an Energy Research Seed Fund grant, has yielded a statistically sound new technique for matching publicly available IAC data with confidential plant information collected in the U.S. Census of Manufacturing (CMF).

Posted On: Monday, Jun 26, 2017 - 12:00 am

Andrew Klinkman is a May 2017 Duke University graduate with dual graduate degrees: a Master of Environmental Management (MEM) degree from the Nicholas School of the Environment and Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree from the Fuqua School of Business. Here he describes his pathway as an energy student at Duke—including how he tapped into the interdisciplinary community and opportunities cultivated by the Duke University Energy Initiative.

Posted On: Monday, Jun 26, 2017 - 12:00 am

Liz Arnason is pursuing dual graduate degrees at Duke University: a Master of Environmental Management (MEM) degree from the Nicholas School of the Environment and Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree from the Fuqua School of Business. Here she describes her pathway as an energy student at Duke—including how she's tapped into the interdisciplinary community and opportunities cultivated by the Duke University Energy Initiative.

Posted On: Monday, Jun 26, 2017 - 12:00 am

Cassidee Kido is a May 2017 Duke University graduate with a bachelor's degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering and a certificate in Energy and Environment. Here she describes her pathway as an energy student at Duke—including how she tapped into the interdisciplinary community and opportunities cultivated by the Duke University Energy Initiative.

Posted On: Monday, Jun 26, 2017 - 12:00 am

Nathaniel Sizemore is a May 2017 Duke University graduate with an A.B. in Public Policy Studies. Here he describes his pathway as an energy student at Duke—including how he tapped into the interdisciplinary community and opportunities cultivated by the Duke University Energy Initiative 

Posted On: Monday, Jun 26, 2017 - 12:00 am

Paige Swofford is pursuing dual graduate degrees at Duke University: a Master of Environmental Management (MEM) degree from the Nicholas School of the Environment and Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree from the Fuqua School of Business. Here Paige describes her pathway as an energy student at Duke—including how she has tapped into the interdisciplinary community and opportunities cultivated by the Duke University Energy Initiative.

Posted On: Thursday, Jun 22, 2017 - 12:00 am

The Trump Administration has been vocal about changing a range of climate and environmental policies. On June 1, for instance, Trump announced plans to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Climate Agreement. In a Climate Economics Chair policy brief published a few days later, Duke professor Jonathan Wiener took a closer look at proposed changes, potential obstacles, and possible future paths in a brief published by the Climate Economics Chair.

“The future of climate policy is not determined by a single actor,” writes Wiener. “Analysts and activists may imagine optimal climate policy being made by a single benevolent decision maker, but the reality is that climate policy – for better or worse, and both internationally and domestically – involves actions by multiple decision makers with diverse instruments and interests.”

In addition to his brief, Wiener also took part in three-question Q&A with the Climate Economics Chair to provide additional context to the American withdrawal of the Paris Agreement, the role of the Environmental Protection Agency and the topic of a federal carbon tax.

Wiener has professorial appointments in Duke Law School, Nicholas School of the Environment, and Sanford School of Public Policy. He is also co-director of the Rethinking Regulation program at Duke's Kenan Institute for Ethics and is a member of the Energy Initiative's Faculty Advisory Committee. This fall, he will co-lead a Bass Connections research team on Governance and Adaptive Regulation of Transformational Transportation Technologies. 

Posted On: Wednesday, Jun 21, 2017 - 4:56 pm

Duke is committed to being carbon-neutral by 2024. Coupled with offsets and energy efficiency, a carbon policy can move the university closer to this goal. The carbon pricing project set out to find ways to measure and influence both individual and institutional change to reduce Duke’s carbon footprint in pursuit of the university’s 2024 goal. They wanted to identify ways departments could take action—and what data they would need to do so. And they wanted to explore the idea of an internal carbon charge program like that instituted at Yale University. 

Find out what the students recommended—and take a peek at their reflections on the project, administered by the Duke University Energy Initiative as part of the Bass Connections in Energy theme. 

Posted On: Tuesday, Jun 20, 2017 - 12:23 pm

A team of Duke University experts (including EI interim director Brian Murray, Billy Pizer and Christina Reichert) published a June 2017 Harvard Environmental Law Journal essay as part of a Symposium on "Increasing Emissions Certainty Under a Carbon Tax." Their piece discusses emissions measurement, identifies and analyzes mechanisms that could increase emissions certainty, and points to areas for additional research. 

Posted On: Tuesday, Jun 13, 2017 - 10:07 am

Leah Louis-Prescott (MEM'18) wants her career to make a direct impact on the issue of climate change. That's why she headed to Duke's Nicholas School of the Environment for graduate school. "I knew I needed to better understand the nuances of how the energy system functions, why progress has been slow, and how we can advance renewables through policy," she recalls. In this profile, we illuminate one energy student's learning journey—and how Duke's approach to energy education is supporting her professional growth.